PPS Is a constellation of new symptoms 

POST-POLIO SYNDROME

Is a constellation of new symptoms 

Fatigue, weakness, pain, cold intolerance, muscle atrophy, or new problems with activities of daily living), occurring in survivors of definitively (by history, exam or electrical studies) proven acute poliomyelitis, after a period of at least 15 years of stable recovery and performance, and in the absence of any other medical or neurological condition.

It is felt to result from the weakening and loss of previously recovered lower motor neuron connections to muscle, possibly due to aging, greater fragility of the recovered nerves, or immune system dysregulation. Onset can be insidious, progression is usually slow, and treatment is most successful with rehabilitation strategies.    – Susan Perlman, MD

Metabolic stimulants (L-carnitine*, L-acylcarnitine, co-enzyme Q), used to improve the ability of muscle to make energy and possibly reduce fatigue and improve strength, have also been tried by polio survivors, but have been associated with rare allergic reactions and insomnia (Lehmann, C, 1994; Nibbett, J, 1996). 

* A placebo-controlled study, as yet unpublished, recently done in Germany showed no significant difference between placebo and L-carnitine.

Specific anti-fatigue drugs can act either in the brain itself (on pathways controlled by dopamine and nonadrenaline) or by improving communication at the nerve-muscle connection. These are, respectively, central and peripheral agents. Centrally acting anti-fatigue medications include amantadine [Symmetrel], bromocriptine [Parlodel], selegiline [l-deprenyl], pemoline[Cylert], ephedrine and certain antidepressants (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors [Prozac (fluotoxine), Seroxat (paroxetine) Effexor, etc.], which may also have nonadrenaline activity). All have been tested in other fatiguing neurologic illnesses but only the first three have been studied in post-polio syndrome.

Amantadine provided no reduction in fatigue (Stein, DP, 1995), but bromocriptine (Bruno, RL, 1996) and selegiline (Bamford, DR, 1993) did. Several studies have been done using pyridostigmine, [Mestinon] a peripherally-acting drug, (Trojan, DA, 19931995Seizert, BP, 1994; Trojan DA, 1997 *) that reflected variable effects on fatigue, possible mild improvement in strength in very weak muscles and notable side effects (primarily gastrointestinal). 

 

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